Author Archives: haroldchorneyeconomist

About haroldchorneyeconomist

I am Professor of political economy at Concordia university in Montréal, Québec, Canada. I received my B.A.Hons (econ.&poli sci) from the University of Manitoba. I also completed my M.A. degree in economics there. Went on to spend two years at the London School of Economics as a Ph.D. student in economics and then completed my Ph.D. in political economy at the University of Toronto. Was named a John W.Dafoe fellow, a CMHC fellow and a Canada Council fellow. I also was named a Woodrow Wilson fellow in 1968 after completing my first class honours undergraduate degree. Worked as an economist in the area of education, labour economics and as the senior economist with the Manitoba Housing and Renewal Corporation for the Government of Manitoba from 1972 to 1978. I also have worked as an economic consultant for MDT socio-economic consultants and have been consulted on urban planning, health policy, linguistic duality and public sector finance questions by the governments of Manitoba, Saskatchewan,the cities of Regina and Saskatoon, Ontario and the Federal government of Canada. I have also been consulted by senior leaders of the British Labour party, MPs from the Progressive Conservative party, the Liberal party and the New Democrats on economic policy questions. Members of the Government of France under the Presidency of Francois Mitterand discussed my work on public sector deficits. I have also run for elected office at the municipal level. I first began to write about quantitative easing as a useful policy option during the early 1980s.

Canadian Federal budget once again a progressive document

I haven‘t yet fully read and digested the latest Canadian  Federal budget but so far I find it to be a realistic and progressive assessment of the likely course of the Canadian economy over the next year. Unemployment although at … Continue reading

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Financial market shenanigans resurface

The New York Times has an excellent article by William D.Cohan warning about the reappearance in the financial markets of 2008 style financial practices which led to the collapse in 2008. Citing speeches by the Fed chairman Jerome Powell , … Continue reading

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The United Kingdom at the crossroads (I update this sometimes daily until the situation is clarified latest updates at the end of the post)

The British writers and historians Anthony Beevor and Artemis Cooper in 1994 co-authored a richly detailed history and narrative of Paris after the liberation 1944-1949 (London: Penguin Books revised edition, 2004) In the preface to the book they make a haunting … Continue reading

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The technique of deficit finance

I am republishing below again. a post I wrote trying to explain the multiplier as an effective policy tool embedded in Keynesian deficit finance. It first appeared in my older blog on blogspot Harold Chorney political economist in the middle … Continue reading

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The Great Depression revisited:learning from history

(originally published on my blogspot blog site, haroldchorneypoliticaleconomist.blogspot.com February 20 , 2006) The Great Depression which began after the stock market crash in the fall of 1929 and lasted in its extreme form until 1934 and its aftermath form until … Continue reading

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Federal Reserve very wisely puts interest rate rises on hold

The chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell has very sensibly reviewed the current economic climate including a potentially messy Brexit, slower growth in China and low inflation and low oil prices and decided not to continue its policy of … Continue reading

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Departure of eight Labour MPs and three Conservative MPs poses serious potential challenge to Labour party leadership in the UK

At a critical point in British politics because of the challenges and confusion surrounding Brexit eight Labour politicians have quit the Labour Party and decided to sit as independents with the intention of creating a new centrist party .They have … Continue reading

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